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It took a chance encounter in a bar in Berlin to turn me onto Le Cool. Don't it always seem to go that way? That was nearly six years ago. By May 2009, Issue *001 had been dispatched. I remember thinking it would be hard to fill a weekly issue. Who would write for us? Who would read it?

A combination of sweat, blood, beers and tears means that now, Le Cool Dublin is 241 issues old and enjoys over 20k subscribers. 

However, for me, the time of departure is at hand. I’ve had the time of my life over the past five intoxicating years. Every exit is an entry somewhere else and rather than hang on like a weary hipster I’m sidestepping Le Cool to take the reins at Sweatshop Media.

Culture is a choir of many voices and a culture mag is no different. It would be impossible to list all the people who have made my Le Cool experience unforgettably brilliant but I've made a stab at it over HERE

It wasn’t a craic house, it was a craic home.

A very special word of thanks to Michael, Kate (from intern to editor and no doubt beyond), Amy, Steve Doogan, Sean&Yvette, ABGC (and all those at South Studios), Bea, Rene, Henri Pierre in the mothership, Chompsky, Camille, K and E.

"I’m always seeing new things and trying to go further and explore a bit more." - Alan Ruane
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August 28 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Two Days, One Night

The premise of Two Days, One Night is deceptively simple: a woman returning to work after a prolonged period of sick leave must convince her colleagues to forego their €1,000 bonuses so she can keep her factory job. Starring Marion Cotillard as Sandra, a woman struggling with depression who must summon every molecule of strength to hustle and plead with her co-workers to sympathise with her plight, it's anything but simple. Instead, it's an achingly humane and involving character study that explores, among other things, life on the margins and self-worth. As Sandra, Cotillard is a marvel - quietly devastating, but eminently believable. Over the course of two days, she experiences little triumphs and extreme heartbreak, and the viewer is with her every step of the way. Tender and affecting, it's one to seek out. / Amy O'Connor

 

August 28 2014


where
The MART Gallery, 190a Rathmines Road Lower, Dublin, Ireland


when
Until 4 September

how much
Free

exhibition
Landmarked

If you ask an Irish person for directions the landmarks they use will be pubs. So the adage goes but this is changing as art culture and appreciation levels out, making artwork more accessible. Landmarked explores the notion of what these markers are while questioning the purpose of guerrilla art in Dublin's public spaces. More than showcasing the colours & shapes that are normally etched on our city's walls, this exhibit elevates street art & the confines of a gallery space make these works no less impressive. Each piece creates its own frame, allowing the space within the studio to dictate their position. Explosive portraits adorn the walls capturing vivid movement & raw emotion. This show could be the catalyst that allows us examine our public spaces for what they could be; tapestries of urban life & design. / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

   
 

August 28 2014


where
The Light House Cinema, Market Square, Smithfield, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
3pm

how much
Free

screening
Silent Running

Rarely does a film reinvent itself as a cult classic due to one film critic, but Mark Kermode’s championing of Silent Running on his podcast over the years has raised it above the cacophony of 70s sci-fi films with dodgy sets, even dodgier jumpsuits and overly quaffed hair. Environmentally prescient, the film follows Bruce Dern’s botanist character and his battle with his fellow astronauts and bosses down on earth to preserve the last remaining forest and plant life, now only contained in the space ships they are responsible for. Ordered to destroy the forest so the ships can be used for commercial use, Dern has to weigh human life against their precious cargo. With his robot companions – some of the most endearing you’ll see on celluloid – in tow, the galaxy drifts by as the last forests die. All in all, the quaffed one was right. / Hugh Torpey

 

August 28 2014


where
Teacher's Club, 36 Parnell Square West Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
8pm (Saturdays, 2pm matinée)

how much
€15/€12

theatre
Collected Stories

One of the things I most vehemently criticise about Dublin's theatre landscape (which is an oasis of new, exciting writing, swollen with potential), is its tendency to neglect established plays which have been performed to acclaim in London or New York, your Jumpys, August Osage Countys, or That Faces. It's refreshing, therefore, to see an Irish company unintimidated by Pulitzer recipient Donald Margulies' Collected Stories. The act of writing is non-present in this play about the art of writing - which, if Margulies is to be believed, is about listening and observance. The relationship of mentor and teacher is aptly observed in this touching production, which rolls along, the characters growing and changing, from guru to student, through to equals, and right back again. / Kate Coleman

   
 

August 29 2014


where
Pavilion Theatre, Marine Road, Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
01 231 2929‎
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€26

gig
Bonnie Prince Billy

The mystical, marvellous, mesmerising Mr Will Oldham is back in town. It's been an age since we first fell under his spell in the Baggot Inn, when we ALL wore plaid shirts and the internet was specialist hosiery. He remained an enigma for many years, and though we now know more about him (thanks internet), he still retains that aura of otherworldliness - or maybe othertimeliness. Everything he does seems distilled with an honesty and authenticity that is rare and noble. His guileless country-inflected songs are by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, softhearted and salty but always affecting. The current album Bonnie Prince Billy is no different. There's no knowing what mood he will be in on the 29th, but no matter, this man is always worth witnessing. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

August 30 2014


where
29 Upper Clanbrassil Street, Dublin 8

when
From 4pm (coffee shop from 8am)

how much
Depends


MVP

Francis McKenna's was one of those foreboding spots for an out of towner of a certain age. Nestled by the entrance to the fuel depot at Harold's Cross Bridge it had a bang of Carling off it. Of course, this is the wild presumption of someone who never crossed its door and I've tempered my tune after reading Brian Purcell's wonderful article about The Cabra House in the current We Are Dublin. Still the Bodytonic maestros took it over, stripped it down, invested a lick of paint and, hey presto, turned it into a charming local. Its lack of frills and beats and heads make it inviting. They host pub quizzes and have just opened a coffee shop called Cafe en Swan. There's yoga and Bloody Marys on Sundays, of course. I'm not sure what Francis would make of it all but MVP is a pub with no fuss which naturally means it expects, and in this case deserves, a fuss fuss. / Zach Joyce

 

August 29 2014


where
Oonagh Young Gallery, 1 James Joyce Street, Liberty Corner, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
Until 5 September

how much
Free

exhibition
Art for Gaza

If ever there was an exhibition to restore your faith in humanity, Art For Gaza at the lovely, illuminated Oonagh Young Gallery is it. This collection of donated works coming from seventeen artists are open to the public and on sale with 100% of proceeds going to the UNICEF Gaza Appeal. Pieces range relativity to the cause, some much more so and many not at all, featuring depictions of hope in the form of a bronze cast deflated balloon to a portrait of young boy donning a suit sat smiling amidst debris in an arid and war-torn expanse. This collection takes the artist out of the foreground and lets a good thing happen. Peruse, donate and purchase if you can, many beautiful pieces gone and many to go. / Jack Gibson

   
 

August 30 2014


where
The New Theatre, 43 Essex Street East, Dublin 2
01 670 3361
Location Map

when
See link

how much
€10 per screening, €50 weekend

festival
Feminist Film Festival

The F word certainly has been thrown about a bit of late. Between the slutwalks, #girlbosses and Queen Bey’s performance cum proclamation that she is indeed one, feminism and all those that align themselves with the title have been well and truly reeled in from the fringes and thrust into the mainstream. Whilst this verbal and visual discourse has certainly shed light upon the inequality that exists between genders the chasm between the two is ever present. In it’s debut season the Feminist Film Festival is screening films in which women have been integral to the creation and production of the film, in whichever capacity. All proceeds will be given to SASANE and a weekend pass is available, ‘case you’re torn between all the female realness on show. / Sophie Donaldson

   
 

August 30 2014


where
Douglas Hyde Gallery, Trinity College, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
Until 1st October

how much
Free

exhibition
Dukkha

If you’re looking to escape the gaggles of migrating tourists around the city duck into the quiet environs of The Douglas Hyde Gallery for Dukkha. A collection of works from five Irish-based contemporary artists, these inhabit individual spheres which all connected by a shared tangent, the eponymous buddhist concept denoting our understanding of pain and how to lead a harmonious life with it. Greeted by a large papier-maché and bin-bag banana peel (Sam Keogh, Untitled), we are then granted the space and confronted with the familiar ways in which we deal with difficulties, humour or anguish. From Aleana Egans seatless chairs and rungless ladders to Fergus Feehily’s delicately frustrating depiction of ill-aligned patterns at seams, this collection will make you think of coping mechanisms and how you surpass disappointment. / Jack Gibson

 

August 30 2014


where
Theatre Upstairs, Above Lanigan’s Pub, Eden Quay, Dublin 1


when
1pm

how much
€10/€8

theatre
Out of Print

Out of Print, a show devised by Gumption Theatre Company, sees one young man learn about his mother's past, hear the stories which he never never thought to ask about and learn the dark and unnerving truths of the woman who is now slipping beyond his reach. Flitting through her penned tales we catch glimpses of a woman who found joy in adventure, who worried about and loved her son and whose darkest components he could never have imagined. This young company have made an ambitious show showcasing the various talents of the cast in a series of portraiture, incorporating moments of music, movement, spoken word and storytelling along the way. With a immersive stage and clever lighting, Out Of Print is in turns poignant and eerie and a promising production from Ireland's next batch of players. / Jack Gibson

   
 

August 31 2014


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
4pm

how much
€10

tea party
Vintage Tea Party

The perfect cup of tea. Some may say tea is entirely subjective hence ‘not exactly my cup of tea’. However, these people are wrong and I shall continue to claim to hold the glorious secret. In the beginning, there was light, and under that light was a kettle to boil the water to enjoy a cup of tea. One must immediately pour boiling water from kettle to bag in mug. Catch that watery goodness before it fades from it’s boiling peak and starts applying to Big Brother. Then, pour that sugar on me, or perhaps, the tea, so it dissolves with a few quick stirs. Leave that bag sit whilst it’s life flashes before it for about a minute, till you pour just a tip of milk to give that lovely creamy brown colour. You think you can make a better cup of tea? Meet me at the Grand Social at 4. I shall be in the corner with a cape and a Zig and Zag mug. / Ciara Roche

   
 

September 01 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Night Moves

It’s hard to put the word “Night” in a film’s title without it sounding a bit...blue; well, unless the word “Dead” also appears in the title. However, those of you expecting some sort of carnal interplay between Jesse Eisenberg and Dakota Fanning are in for a disappointment. The Night Moves on display are those of dam destruction through eco-terrorism - although some of you will be glad to hear the dialogue is free from lecturing. From director Kelly Reichardt, this is a film that builds tension through character interaction and their reaction to events rather than the events themselves. A slow burner that should be seen by those who like their thrillers a bit more tinker, tailor than expendable. / David Cadwallader

   
 

September 02 2014


where
Savoy Cinema, 17 Upper O'Connell Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
2pm, 4.15pm, 6.30pm & 8.50pm

how much
€7-€8.50

cinema
Lucy

Lucy is the type of film you leave the cinema smiling after. It's ambitious, ludicrous and utterly flawed. This is the whimsical output of director Luc Besson who probably undertook the whole endeavour as an incredibly serious affair. Imagine The Raid with Terence Malick flourishes. Lucy (Scarlett Johansson) has been forced to internally traffic CPH4, a drug which expands brain capacity leading to kick-ass super hero invincibility coupled with a physical morphing meltdown. Interspersing the 10% to 100% ramping up effect of this drug with nature montages and hallucinogenic internal digestive sequences leads to a thrilling and  disjointed experience. Throw Morgan Freeman into the mix as a superflous scientist who dials in his sincerity and you've got a heady caper. This is the definition of cinematic OTT. Still I left the cinema smiling. / Michael McDermott

   
 

September 03 2014


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€24.50

gig
An Evening with Candi Staton

Candi Staton is a totem of the genesis of modern American music, from country music, to disco, to R'n'B. The genres my be intertwined, but it takes a spectacular vocal to master them all, which is why you must all hush, hush, very quiet now, as she takes to the stage in the intimate Sugar Club, for a concert and conversation. She has been surrounded by the cacophony of all-sorts that make the music industry so intoxicating to the glorious few, and all those looking in through the frosted window at the glamour within, which should make for a fascinating discussion. With incredible hits in her repertoire, such as Stand By Your Man, Young Hearts Run Free, and You Got The Love, the time is ripe to revisit her legacy, in the wake of 2013's Summer of Disco. / Kate Coleman

 

September 03 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€12

cinema
Quest for Fire

Quest for Fire is a paleolithic vision. Set in that time that caveman diet fanatics find themselves constantly referencing, it is the story of fire. Man make fire - man must regulate fire. An examination of human behaviour in its rawest form, the film is an anthropological feast. Made in the early eighties, it remains a cult film of fascination, which is reflected in the wealth of references to it within popular culture, from Ellen, to Buffy the Vampire Slayer, right through to Family Guy. Being shown as an accompaniment to the current TBG&S exhibit of The Sophisticated Neanderthal Interview by Nathan Mellors, its relevance is clearly enduring. So get out of your cave and watch it. / Kate Coleman

   
 
Raglan

We chatted family and fashion with Amy and Ross of lifestyle store Raglan.

Amy: Ross is my brother-in-law, and him and my sister Jilly started dating when we were in school, and our families knew each other. We were always at his family's shop Nimble Fingers getting art supplies and Sylvanians.

My background is fashion design, and retail. When I finished, Jilly and I had a surf shop off Grafton Street. About a year ago I started working at Foodgame, Ross' business, and found myself learning and enjoying it for about a year, and then I visited my little sister in NZ, in Raglan, and when I came back he suggested we start a business, putting our two areas of expertise and our interests together.

We would love it to be a place where people hang out, and have a coffee and a personal shopping experience. We encourage people to get a sit down coffee, not a take-away! There's no pressure to leave! The clothes are really important. They are unique to us, there's no one space offering what we have. We have brought brands that are unavailable here to Dublin, so you know there isn't going to be a load of people wearing the same thing!

Raglan, 56/58 Drury Street, Dublin 2. PHOTO: Catherine Black 




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