dublin

this week

THESE ARE THIS WEEK'S LE COOL LISTINGS. WANT MORE? CLICK ON THE 'WHEN' NAVIGATION TO VIEW TODAY OR THIS WEEKEND'S ACTIVITIES...

Signup for the weekly magazine

   
 
 

It's with great delight this week that we officially announce what has been de facto for quite some time. Kate Coleman ('Kate', 'Kate Frances', 'Studio Kate') has taken the Editor's reins at Le Cool Dublin. In a solemn ceremony which didn't involve tears, tantrums or a physical fight, Ciaran handed over the steering of the good ship LCD (eventually) to the one person whom he trusted to navigate the choppy waters of cultural writing on his behalf. When Michael didn't want the job, he handed it to Kate. :)

Kate has plotted, jotted and talent spotted with Le Cool Dublin since joining as an intern in 2011. She is the very ethos of a city we try to capture every week. Witty, engaging, culturally curious and fearless in her creativity. In reality she has been acting as Editor for some time now, but we felt it necessary to mark it officially with some pomp and circumstance. 

While Ciaran moves to his assigned role 'upstairs', where he'll have more time for reflection, brandy and cigars, it falls to Kate to take you onwards on your voyage of Dublin discovery. Rest assured you are in safe hands, for not since Oscar Wilde edited The Woman's World in the 1880s has there been a better, more worthy appointment. The King is dead, long live the Queen. 

Who is all about Dun Laoghaire and doing the stepaside this week? Ciaran, Kate, Michael or Amy.

"...Paddy Pigeon and his sidekick Colin. Colin Pigeon." - Annie West
... Read More
   
 

April 10 2014


where
Irish Architectual Archive, 45 Merrion Square, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
10am - 5pm (Tues-Fri) until April 25

how much
Free

photo exhibition
Dublin Shops

Peer through a window into the soul of a shop. In a world without the visual merchandiser, font enforcers and the tyranny of 'look into my shop front window', Paul Tierney captures the straight up, unadorned charm of the shop that does exactly what it says somewhere on the window. Bernina Electronic Sewing Machine Centre (sales & service specialists) hasn't decided to lure a hip street artist or consult the font folk to come up with a spotlit Singer that can sew the name of the person looking at it through ID recognition. Nope it's like a window where all the merch is screaming and clawing against the window pane trying to escape, like a freak show of moths seeking the light. There are more restrained versions but there's an ill-fitting yet focused love about them all. A note on where the shop is wouldn't have gone amiss though. / Michael McDermott

 

April 10 2014


where
Odessa Club, 13 Dame Court, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€10

talk
Culture Vultures

One of the most pleasing aspects about the development of this city’s cultural output in recent years is the increasing emphasis on the mixing of genres on offer at any given event. Perhaps taking their lead from festival offerings such as Mindfield at Electric Picnic, more and more people and promoters are buying into the notion of the creative individual as a multi-faceted entity and accordingly so nights are displaying a range of offerings on display. Tony Clayton-Lea is the brain behind this new series in the cosy surrounds of The Odessa Club and the chance to hear the gloriously raspy folk tones of Lisa O Neill backed up by the incredible vocal gymnastics of Poet John Cummins and topped off by a discussion with director Lenny Abrahamson all on one night speaks of a town finally seeking to mine the full wealth of talent at it’s disposal. / Emmet Condon

 

April 10 2014


where
Temple Bar Gallery & Studios, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
Free

exhibition
The mind was dreaming. The world was its dream.

A quote from Jorge Luis Borges is as good as any name for a contemporary exhibition and The mind was dreaming. The world was its dream looks set to bring together four names you probably won’t be forgetting in a hurry. Curated by Paula Naughton, the work of Brazilian photographer Jonathas de Andrade will be on display, along with the Mexican musings of Edgardo Aragón, Dubliner Gavin Murphy and Sweden-based Lisa Tan in a kaleidoscopic showcase that seeks to “uncover alternate truths”. Guests on the night can take in projects ranging in style from the portraits of 4000 strangers, a powerful and moving anti-mining video, and my personal fave, the projection of scenic mountain landscapes taken from National Geographic magazines from the 70s. Who doesn’t love a good mountain? / Philip Notaro

   
 

April 12 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
see link

how much
Free

talk
IFI Spotlight

Michael D is currently on an all­-conquering, first ever state visit to the UK, being received by the queen and making the common folk of the UK believe in the existence of leprechauns, but the fruits of another one of his labours will be under the spotlight as the IFI presents a day long seminar on key new Irish features. Although our indigenous film industry has gotten a bit of bad press after a controversially shambolic IFTA awards ceremony, recent critical smash Calvary, the upcoming adaptation of John Banville's The Sea and Pat Collins' follow up to the acclaimed Silence, Living In A Coded Land, show Irish cinema is in rude health and pushing forward in ambition and quality. If it wasn't for our now president reconstituting the Irish Film Board back in 1993 we'd be a poorer nation, both artistically and financially. Cheers, a Shoilse. / Kate McEvoy

 

April 10 2014


where
Smock Alley Theatre, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€15/€12

theatre
Cornerstones

In a harrowing and brutally honest portrayal of a delicate and socially relevant subject, this powerful production tells the story of four homeless Dublin teenagers and life’s cornerstones which have rooted their downfall, their faded aspirations and lost hope. With dreams of making it big, finding family and returning home, a young and talented cast gives an engaging performance which renders laughter and tears by fusing drugs, excess, love and desperation. The constant that remains is excess, uncertainty and sheer disorder. The most thought provoking sentiments and sombre realisations however lie in the quieter moments of this play. / Claire Mullane

 

April 10 2014


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€25

comedy
Sean Hughes

Sean Hughes first became the King of Grim with his Perrier aware-winning show, A One Night Stand, which was less about one night stands, and more about ringing your parents because you are so very, very alone. The kinda guy who used to ring Beckett on his toy phone, Hughes has grown up into an even more theatre-led comedian. His last show, Life Becomes Noises, picked up on the father-son tension we saw in Sean's Book/Sean's Show's Shaking Cream. He reverted to the hospital set, and attempted to grieve for the passing of his father through comedy. It was as close to a one-man play as it was a stand-up set, and we could glimpse the qualities that made him such a 90s cult through the theatrics. Expect his usual brand of Morrissey misery-lite, cos what more do you need? / Kate Coleman

   
 

April 11 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
see link

how much
€6 - €9

cinema
20 Feet from Stardom

As someone born within 24 hours of Lady Gaga, I’m all too familiar with the pain of living in the shadow of an international pop phenomenon. An abject lack of musical talent means that, sadly, my own party piece is destined to remain the spoken word intro to All Saints’ Never Ever, but the backing vocalists featured in Oscar-winning documentary 20 Feet From Stardom possess the kind of singing chops that would keep an Appleton sister up at night. Tracing musical and social evolution through the 60s, 70s and 80s, this personality-packed feature matches faces to voices we hear everyday and considers the frustrating factors that can deny a big talent its fifteen minutes. Tragic but ultimately triumphant, 20 Feet From Stardom’s buoyant spirit is bolstered by a soundtrack that I’ve found to be ripe for squawking along tunelessly to. / Joey Kavanagh

 

April 11 2014


where
The Grand Social, 35 Lower Liffey Street, Dublin 1.
Location Map

when
10pm

how much
Free

club night
Shotgun

Let us skip the light fandango, for all we need is love and with nowhere to run but the Grand Social, prepare to turn on, tune in and drop out to the artists that will forever occupy the upper echelons of every music critics 100 greatest albums list. From the DJs of the Dublin Beatles Festival, join the love-in of a joyous time less tainted by the cynicism and irony that punk and grunge has dragged us into. The noughties' top 30 chart may scream sex at you like your mother calling upstairs for dinner, but nothing can truly beat seeing a room of groovy cats getting down and dirty to the sensual bop of Otis Redding’s Hard to Handle. If Shotgun! doesn't end with a group hug and sway to Hey Jude, then we have failed the baby boomer generation even more then they have failed us. / Ciara Roche

 

April 11 2014


where
Theatre Upstairs, Above Lanigan’s Pub, Eden Quay, Dublin 1


when
see link

how much
€10/€8

theatre
My Bedsit Window

Without the anaesthetising effects of a couple of pre show glasses of wine, many audiences are self conscious about laughing at even the most obvious joke and less willing to engage with a show. Therefore a sober audience usually proves a good litmus test and if the lunchtime audience at this offering were anything to go by playwright and star David Gilna has a hit on his hands. Taking us through the story of William Blake, an aspiring actor, we follow him through his experiences on the dole, a move to London, working in bars and his first big break. In the midst of this there is laughter, tragedy and one or two sessions. Two other actors pop in and out to play various characters in the story and David keeps us engaged throughout with his infectious energy. Hilarious and engaging this is a cautionary and inspiring tale. / Frances Winston

 

April 11 2014


where
FLOOD, 3 James Joyce Street, Dublin 1.


when
12-6pm

how much
Free

exhibition
Have To Hand, By My Hand, Oh Handyman

The gallery might be thought of as a place where work is displayed de-stemmed, de-blemished and free of any telling trace that human hands ever played a part in bringing it about. By transforming the FLOOD space into a studio then, complete with storage and a paint-flecked work table, the five collaborating artists seem to be complying with the whole world’s insistence that the provenance of absolutely everything that is consumed be made known (short, of course, of naming the ultimate source of it all – God), in a conspicuous, billboard-friendly way. No, those sculptures over there weren’t always to be found fully-formed in a dark crevice somewhere; they are ‘Made in Studio’ by the artist. The exhibition very consciously fans away any myth that might fog the process of its production. / Olen Bajarias

   
 

April 12 2014


where
Liberty Hall, Eden Quay, Dublin 1.


when
10am - 6pm

how much
Free in

fair
Anarchist Book Fair

Even in the face of adversity (read: the era of exponential technological advancement) books remain popular. Why you may ask? Well it’s a no-brainer. Books are more than paper and ink, they're representative of the spark of an idea or a huge step in the quest for enlightenment, both devilishly attractive exploits donchaknow. Remarkably, this weekend sees the Anarchist book fair celebrate its 9th year, though it’s easy to stand the test of longevity when you deal in a practice that grows minds, makes opinions and fosters change. The three day takeover of Liberty Hall consists of books, stalls and talks, all made to get you thinking. There’s even a party and a cycling tour to lure you into flexing your critical faculties so get involved and use up that head space for something far nobler than Simpson's quotes. / Laura Hayley Kavanagh

 

April 12 2014


where
Cabinteely Park, Old Bray Road, Cabinteely, Dublin 18.

when
Until 26 April

how much
Free

family
Inter/Generation

Channel your inner Hadid, Gehry or O'Donnell & Tuomey as Cabinteely Park comes alive with all sorts of architectural happenings over the next fortnight. Inter/Generation comprises a series of free events examining the role of the built environment in our lives. Most of the activities will be located at the Grainstore, dlr’s Youth Arts Facility in the park. Workshops for children and their families will explore the world of buildings (with some healthy demolition thrown in). A film series includes Peter Greenaway’s quixotic feature The Draughtsman's Contract. Talks led by architect John McLaughlin (who’s behind Inter/Generation) will look at the crossover between the differing generations, art, architecture and design. Don't forget to unwind with sound, smell and touch in the specially designed ’secret’ enclosed garden. / Des FitzGerald

 

April 12 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
11pm

how much
HERE

gig
Evian Christ

Much like his namesake Jesus, Evian Christ is rising. His star, that is. One year ago, he was a trainee primary school teacher, producing beats in his shed during the summer holidays. After anonymously dropping mixtapes of faintly ominous, industrial beats online, he caught the attention of His Holiness Kanye West. Since then, he has amassed producing credits on Yeezus, ascended the ladder to become part of a cohort of in-demand producers and partied on a yacht with Rick Ross. Eager not to let his collaborations define him, however, he recently released Waterfalls, a four-track collection of stompers that are at once hyper and stark, and utterly entrancing and addictive. Catch him before he departs for New York to work on Kanye's label and become kind of a big deal. Win Tickets / Amy O'Connor

 

April 12 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
22:45

how much
HERE

cinema
Working Girl

"Romantic Comedies About Career Gals Ascending the Corporate Ladder and Finding Love in the Process" is basically my favourite genre of film. Unfortunately, it's a genre that's oft neglected in favour of, like, "Dystopian Movies About Hardy, Athletic Teens Fighting For Survival and Finding Love in the Process". As such, I find myself returning to Working Girl again and again. Arguably the best in its genre, Working Girl has everything one could want in a film: plucky heroines, romance, intrigue, shoulder pads, two-tone eyeshadow. The real star of the film, however, is the copious amount of Elnett used to keep these girls' hair in top, gravity-defying form. This screening, dubbed a Big '80s Hair Night, is one for all the ladies and gents with heads for business and bods for sin. / Amy O'Connor

   
 

April 12 2014


where
Talbot Gallery, 51 Talbot Street, Dublin 1
Location Map

when
11am

how much
€11.50

talk
Eat|Talk|Art

This is an event for the early risers, those who wake up with a smile on their face to greet the sun rather than those who roll out of bed after hitting the snooze button five times. You will need to be in a state of at least semi-consciousness to attend this breakfast as it will be a rather cultured affair with a discussion between artists Alison Pilkington and Joe Scullion. Scullion’s work forms the current exhibition in the gallery entitled Waiting to Materialise, a collection of abstract architecture paintings. Breakfast guests will feast on homemade granola, fruit and berries with fresh bread and cakes. In a lovely twist of fate the gallery space was once a restaurant so this event ticks all the boxes. / Aisling Kett

 

April 12 2014


where
d-Light Studios, 46 North Great Clarence St, Dublin 1
Location Map

when
1-7pm

how much
Free

party
Market Party

A casual party? Now we are talking. None of this forced fun nonsense. Too teutonic. Give us the laid back, Serge Gainsbourg of parties. All casual and cool and totally at ease. D-Light Studios are following up their successful Market Party, where people browsed though stalls of kooky products while listening to live music and imbibing a beer or two with this second edition. Adding in a beauty salon, a coffee shop, a kids corner and more, they are blurring the lines between a market and a party to keep you off the streets again this Saturday. They'll been sauntering around the great studio space between 1-7pm today so drop in and chill out. / Vernon Steel 

 

April 12 2014


where
Project Arts Centre, 39 East Essex St, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
2:30pm

how much
€5

talk
If I Go Suddenly: Charity Shop Stories

If I go suddenly, give all my charity shop buys back to the charity shop. My Harris tweed, split at the seam in order to sneak a naggin into the lining, the old lady shoes from my Alexa Chung phase, and the jazz records I have neither a turntable for or an interest in, should all be bagged up in mourning black, and given to a sweet old dear in the charity shop. The dented Miss Marple hats, the high-waisted, headache-inducing 1960s neon pencil skirts, and paisley silk scarves will be returned into the Bermuda Triangle of SVdPs, Oxfams, and Banardos. Hopefully teenagers will pick up the vintage leather suitcases, clackety typewriters, and velvet capes, and embark on a lifetime of chic charity shopping too. But will this charity shop experience always be so pure? As they say in the Junior Cert, 'DISCUSS:' / Kate Coleman

   
 

April 13 2014


where
Mansion House, Dawson Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
Free

launch
MusicTown

Dublin’s loaded cultural calendar will have to make room for another musical jamboree next year and this one has a particularly colloquial slant. MusicTown, which sounds vaguely like a CBeebies show, will be an annual showcase of the very best of Dublin-made music across all genres, celebrating the capital’s sonic melting pot of musicians, collaborators, curators and punters. It has the considerable weight of Dublin City Council behind it, and while the festival itself is on next April, it’s announcing itself with this Leagues O’Toole-cherry picked launch concert which promises to be a Jools Holland-y type shindig hosted by John Kelly featuring Lisa O’Neill, Donal Lunny and Paddy Glackin, Clu, Our Lady’s Choral Society, Bell X1 and plenty others. Free tickets can be blagged at the MusicTown.ie website. Win Tickets / Mark Keane

 

April 16 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
see link

how much
€5.20-€8.90

cinema
Calvary

Within film circles, Sundance darling Calvary is hurtling towards a state of near hyperbole. Already heralded a modern classic, it stars Brendan Gleeson as Father Lavelle, the ‘good’ priest who receives a death threat from the other side of the confessional. The raw slice of Sligo coastline that is home to his parish is as unforgiving as its inhabitants, the multitude of deeply flawed and deeply realistic characters an intricate cross section of Irish society. Alongside the cherry picked supporting cast, featuring Chris O’Dowd, Dylan Moran and Kelly Reilly is that most popular of Irish themes, Catholic guilt. Bearing the brunt of the failings of the government, economy and church, the infallible Father Lavelle navigates his lot with a dry wit and morbid humour that defines this phenomenal black comedy. / Sophie Donaldson 

   
 

April 14 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€20

gig
Cut Copy

Lights and Music still sticks with me as a track that symbolised the palpable excitement and endless possibility of moving to a new city for college after discovering it in the run up to my Leaving in '08. Six years on I'm still not quite sure where my life is going, but that dynamic within the city is something that still comes back to me with Cut Copy. The quintessentially 90s Snap-esque vocal sample and clattering electric drums of Hearts on Fire bring to mind the vibrant dance culture that I was dreaming of still in Pampers. Whitford's warbling, off-pitch vocals always carry an extra few vowels, that gives the endearing indifference of a nearly-there karaoke singer. Keep your eyes peeled tonight - like the ever changing city we live in, Blink and You'll Miss a Revolution. / Connor Clarke

 

April 14 2014


where
National Print Museum, Old Garrison Chapel, Beggars Bush, Haddington Road, Dublin 4
Location Map

when
9.00 - 5.00

how much
Free

exhibition
What you maybe meant to keep

If, like me, you're a bit of a political wonk and relish curling up in front of RTÉ on count day, watching as newly-elected Laois/Offaly TDs get lifted on to the shoulders of their supporters, then What You Maybe Meant To Keep is for you. As local and European elections loom, the National Print Museum has partnered up with Alan Kinsella of the online political ephemera repository Irish Election Literature to host an exhaustive exhibition of vintage election literature featuring faces like Mary Robinson, Eamon de Valera, Dessie O'Malley Charles Haughey. You know, THE LADS. The exhibition also boasts some material from the Irish Left Archive, including publications and posters. A fascinating trip down memory lane that will make you think twice about binning that aspiring local councillor's leaflet. / Amy O'Connor

   
 

April 15 2014


where
Pavilion Theatre, Marine Road, Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
01 231 2929‎
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€16/€14

concert
Rachel Kolly d'Alba

If you missed the opening concert of Rachel Kolly d’Alba’s Irish tour last week in Dublin’s Pepper Canister church, don't despair. Things have come full circle for her final performance in Dun Laoghaire tonight. Violinist Kolly d’Alba has been described as one of the best of her generation and together with pianist, and fellow Swiss, Christian Chamorel, they're performing a programme entitled ‘The French Connection’. Featured works include pieces by Fauré, Chausson, Franck, Ravel and (odd one out) Raymond Deane. A child prodigy who made her debut as a concerto soloist at the terrifyingly early age of 12, Kolly d’Alba has been praised both for her electrifying intensity on stage and her beautifully nuanced recordings of works by composers such as Saint-Saëns, Ravel and Ysaÿe. / Des FitzGerald

 
Salt Lick City

We spoke with William Toft and Brian McCarthy of new pop-up Salt Lick.

We studied culinary arts together, and always talked about different ideas, things we'd like to do. We'd say, "Oh, I'd like to have a Swedish meatball place" but then talking it out, you'd say "...that's probably a bad idea." The barrier to all our huge dreams was that at the end of the day we would never be able to set up a full-blown business venture. So after 10 years of those conversations we decided to just go for it. We would take all the barriers and use them as a catalyst for new ideas, creative ideas, and let them shape the offer, if that makes sense.

Kitchens are rigid places where you do the same thing over and over, it gets boring. This is a platform for us to enjoy ourselves - we can have a menu for a month, and from a customer's perspective, like a theatre troupe, we only pull the curtains for a month, and they know that the next time they come, it'll be something different, because there are only so many times you can see the same show. Many pop ups are only there for a certain amount of time, but we want this to continue, and expand into other things.

Salt Lick is open Friday and Saturday nights in Hobarts, 55 Ranelagh Road from 7:30pm. PHOTO: Mark McGuinness




CLOSE

Overlay_title_login_en
CHOOSE A CITY

CLOSE

Overlay_title_login_en

We have sent you a confirmation email.
Please review your inbox to activate your account.
 

If you need any help contact us at any time!

CLOSE

Unsubscribe